The 2 Truths That Reveal Why We Don't Accomplish Our Goals (And Ultimately Accept Failure)

Growing up, failure wasn’t allowed in my household.   

I remember being twelve years old, barely a step into middle school, when I caught the flu the morning of a jump rope fundraiser. My father walked into my bedroom, saw me still under the covers and said, “You’re not awake yet?” 

I had committed to jumping role for an hour straight at my middle school’s gymnasium to raise money for lung cancer. 

“Dad, I can’t,” I said, hovering over the bucket beside my bed. 

“That’s not what Michael Jordan said in the 1997 NBA finals against the Utah Jazz,” he said.

Yes, at 12 years old, my ability to push through in the face of failure was being compared to none other than the great Michael Jordan.

Groaning and on the edge of vomiting, I pulled myself out of bed, held my head in the car, and arrived to a packed gymnasium where I proceeded to jump rope while fighting sweats and shivers, taking intermittent sips of Gatorade. 

I spent the next two days in bed, my father coming in every so often to say, “I’m sorry that was so tough–but I told you that you could do it.”

Anyone who has ever pursued some sort of goal, no matter how big or how small, can pinpoint an infinite number of moments in which failure was a viable option–a “way out.” 

When I fractured my spine playing hockey as a teenager, I had the option of never returning to the sport.

When I was competing as one of the highest ranked World of Warcraft players in North America, I had the option of quitting the game after my teammate disbanded our team.

When I started bodybuilding in college, I had the option of giving up every time I experienced a new injury or grew tired of the overly demanding daily routine.

When I started my first job after college, working in advertising, I had the option of accepting my fate as a copywriter and listening to all the people in my life who said, “You can’t make a living as a full-time writer.”

When I took the leap four years later to become that full-time writer, I had the option of getting scared and throwing in the towel when things didn’t click perfectly right away.

And when I decided I was going to push the boundary even further and start my own writing agency, I could have accepted failure whenever someone told me, “No.”

But every time I’ve pushed through those moments where failure seemed like the only option, my father’s voice has played over and over again in my head:

“I’m sorry that was so tough–but I told you that you could do it.”

In all my pursuits, interests, hobbies and accomplishments, I’ve learned that there are reasons why we, as ambitious humans, fail. And as much as we would like to believe that failure is something that chooses us, the truth is, it’s the other way around.

We choose failure. And in the moments when we make the choice to surrender, give up, and accept things as they are, it’s because we believe one one of these two truths about ourselves:

1. We don’t believe we are capable.

Our comfort zone’s represent what we’ve already done–not what we are about to do.

When we are confronted with a challenge, we tend to compare that challenge to something we’ve already overcome. If the challenge seems less daunting or equally as daunting as something we’ve accomplished, we are less likely to choose failure because we’ve already proven our ability to succeed. 

However, if the challenge appears greater than anything we’ve ever done or successfully overcome in the past, this is where our comfort zone suddenly becomes exceedingly apparent. We see this as the line in the sand–and we doubt our ability to cross it.

2. We believe the pain will outweigh the gain.

Pain without purpose is torture. Pain with a purpose is a price.

Unless we believe that the end result will be worth the road it takes to get there, we will almost always choose to avoid the journey altogether. We see our time and efforts better spent on things that will guarantee a positive result–rather than investing in something that may or may not pay off in the end.

Unfortunately, we very rarely understand the rewards and lessons gained before we leap into the unknown. We can imagine what those gains might be, and weigh their potential value against the tough road ahead, but anyone who has overcome a tough obstacle will tell you their doubts beforehand and their pearls of wisdom gained in the process.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Exclusive: Qualcomm set to win conditional Japanese antitrust okay for NXP deal – source

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – U.S. smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm is set to win “imminent” Japanese antitrust clearance for its $38-billion bid for NXP Semiconductors and gain Europe’s approval by the end of the year with slight tweaks to its concessions, a person familiar with the matter said.

FILE PHOTO: A sign on the Qualcomm campus is seen, as chip maker Broadcom Ltd announced an unsolicited bid to buy peer Qualcomm Inc for $103 billion, in San Diego, California, U.S. November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo

Winning the green light from both competition authorities would take Qualcomm a major step forward to closing the deal and reinforce its fight against an unsolicited $103-billion takeover bid from Broadcom.

The Japan Fair Trade Commission (JFTC) “is expected to clear Qualcomm’s acquisition of NXP imminently,” the source said.

“The European Commission is expected to follow soon.”

The JFTC did not respond to emailed requests for comments sent during out of office hours. The EU competition enforcer, which has set a March 15 deadline to rule on the deal, declined to comment while Qualcomm was not available for comment.

Qualcomm, which supplies chips to Android smartphone makers and Apple, wants to become the leading supplier to the fast-growing automotive chips market via the NXP purchase, the biggest-ever in the semiconductor industry.

To address competition concerns, the company has agreed not to purchase NXP’s standard essential patents and not to take legal action against third parties related to NXP’s near field communication (NFC) patents except for defensive purposes.

It also offered an interoperability pledge which will allow rival products to function with NXP’s products.

NXP co-invented NFC chips which enable mobile phones to be used to pay for goods and store and exchange data.

Qualcomm will make incremental changes to concessions offered to the EU authority last month, the person said.

A similar proposal was also proposed to the JFTC.

Broadcom made its move last week in an effort to become the dominant supplier of chips used in the 1.5 billion or so smartphones expected to be sold around the world this year. Qualcomm has dismissed the offer, saying it undervalues the company.

Broadcom, Qualcomm and NXP together would have control over modems, Wi-Fi, GPS and near-field communications chips, a strong position that could concern customers such as Apple and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd because of the bargaining power such a combined company could have to raise prices.

However, a combined company would also likely have a lower cost base and the flexibility to cut prices.

Editing by Toby Chopra

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Here Are Microsoft’s Best Xbox Deals for Black Friday

With all of the companies getting in on the Black Friday craze, it’s now time for Microsoft to get into the mix.

The company’s resident gaming guru Major Nelson on Thursday announced a variety of Black Friday gaming deals aimed at helping Xbox One owners save some cash not only on games, but also its hardware. And in a move that might appeal to current Xbox One owners, Microsoft is giving those who subscribe to its Xbox Live Gold online gameplay subscription an early start on the deals.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter

Here’s a look at some of the better offers Microsoft is delivering on both games and hardware for Black Friday. And remember: if you’re already an Xbox Live Gold subscriber, you can access the deals now through the Xbox One’s onboard digital shop.

Hardware

  • If you aren’t so keen on buying the new $500 Xbox One X, you can pick up the Xbox One S for just $189 on Black Friday. That’s the cheapest Microsoft has ever sold the console for, and it should deliver to you outstanding gameplay experiences at an affordable price.

10 Best Xbox One Video Game Deals

Microsoft is offering discounts on a slew of titles. And if you want to see them all, click here. But if you want a handy list of great deals on outstanding games, here’s your best bet:

  • Assassin’s Creed Origins is getting a 20% discount on Black Friday. But if you’re an Xbox Live Gold member who buys the game digitally, you’ll get a 30% discount.
  • Call of Duty: WWII will be available at a 5% discount, though Xbox Live Gold users will get a 10% discount.
  • The hit Destiny 2 will benefit from a 17% discount on Black Friday, or a 25% price drop for Xbox Live Gold users.
  • Sport lover? Microsoft is offering the EA Sports FIFA 18 & NHL 18 bundle for 40% off for Xbox Live Gold subscribers. Other Xbox owners can get it at a 30% discount.
  • Final Fantasy XV will be offered at up to a 60% discount on Black Friday.
  • Halo 5: Guardians is getting the Black Friday treatment with up to a 50% discount on the big holiday shopping day.
  • Want to play Madden NFL 18? Get on Black Friday for up to 50% off.
  • Basketball fans will be able to get NBA 2K18 for up to 30% off.
  • Quantum Break will get a steep discount of 40% for non-Xbox Live Gold users and 50% for those who are on the subscription gaming service.
  • Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus is tallying up to a 50% discount on Black Friday.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts