How to Use the Power of Your Personal Brand to Skyrocket Your Business

In his new book, The Rise of the YoupreneurChris Ducker argues that the key to building a sustainable, future-proof business lies within your own experience, interests, and personality. Ultimately, finding success boils down to unleashing the power of your personal brand (what he calls, being a “Youpreneur”).

It sounds simple, but taking the leap to becoming a “youpreneur” takes vulnerability and authenticity.

I know the tactics Ducker suggests in his new book work, because they are the same strategies I used to pivot from my career as a TV news reporter to an entrepreneur. I didn’t know it at the time, but leveraging a strong personal brand and loyal fan-base is what helped me to build a successful business, with zero experience.

Here are my top four takeaways from Ducker’s book, if you want to leverage your personal brand for business success.

1. Be Original

While it may feel like there are no new ideas in business, Ducker suggests you can avoid the copycat marketing that is so prevalent these days, by building a business centered around you.

Anybody can have the same business model, the same services, or the same pricing. But nobody has your exact personality and experiences.

While you might be able to “get by” for a while modeling your business after another, ultimately, being successful boils down to being different and memorable. The easiest way to do it? Infuse your personal brand into your business.

As Ducker says, being different from your competitors beats being “better” every time.

2. Share Stories

You don’t have to look far for the most powerful marketing tool in your business: your own stories of what you have done and what you can do for other people.

Ducker shares that in order to use your stories to attract the right people to your business (and repel the wrong ones), you need to identify your true strengths and weaknesses and use these to captivate your audience.

It makes sense. People like doing business with other people. Major brands spend millions to develop characters or spokespeople that their customers can relate to. The benefit to the “youpreneur” business model is that you already have the spokesperson (you) and the stories to go with it.

Spend time identifying which stories your audience can relate to and leverage those in your marketing.

3. Create Content

Ducker recommends taking one piece of content and re-purposing it on multiple platforms.

This is something I call the “content compound effect.” It’s where you take one piece of content, let’s say a video interview, and you turn it into a blog post, a podcast, and a media pitch. You can develop a webinar around it or offer a live workshop on the topic.

I started doing this in business out of necessity- I just didn’t have the time to create original content on a dozen different platforms. Turns out, it’s a pretty effective marketing hack. If you’re going to spend time creating content, you might as well get the most return out of it as possible. Re-purpose your content for different platforms and you’ll reach more people as a result. 

4. Be an Expert

Ducker shares how he experienced a major shift in business when he decided to put himself front and center by hosting a podcast, blogging, and doing more public speaking.

It’s easier said than done, but for those willing to do it, the rewards are significant.

I’ve worked with many entrepreneurs who are too humble or overwhelmed to take center stage as an expert in their industry. The ones that are willing to take the leap and share their expertise in media interviews, training workshops, and public speaking, benefit from reaching a larger audience and making a bigger impact. 

While Ducker lays out a full strategy to becoming a Youpreneur in his book, I don’t think  it has to be all or nothing. Pick a couple tactics and start small. Begin infusing more of your personal brand into your content or your web copy. Make some media pitches and do a couple podcast interviews. Start peeling back the layers of your business to reveal the authentic, original brand of you and you’ll begin to experience the benefits of being a Youpreneur. 

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6 Keys to Attracting and Nurturing Breakthrough Innovators on Your Own Team

Breakthrough innovation is the dream of every entrepreneur, but it’s still a scarce commodity. Selecting and nurturing people who are likely to help you in this regard is an even more elusive capability, and one that every angel investor, like myself, wishes he could get a lock on.

In fact, every manager and business owner needs this skill just to survive with today’s pace of change. 

We all wish we were the next Steve Jobs, or Elon Musk, or Thomas Edison. If we’re not, then at least we would like to recognize them when they come through the door, or better yet, create a few like them in our own organization.

I wish I understood what makes some people so spectacularly innovative, producing triumph after triumph, while the rest of us merely get by.

I’ve seen a lot of speculation on this challenge over the years, but I was recently impressed with the insights in a new book, Quirky, by Melissa A. Schilling.

From her position as professor at NYU Stern, and recognition as one of the world’s leading experts on innovation, she takes a deep dive into the lives and foibles of eight well-known innovators, including the ones mentioned.

One of her encouraging conclusions is that we all have potential in this regard, which can be brought out naturally by life circumstances and special circumstances, or nurtured by the people and culture around us.

I’ll paraphrase her key recommendations for capitalizing on this potential, for use on yourself and members of your team:

1. Incentivize people to challenge norms and accepted constraints.

Everyone wants to fit in, but most of us have felt a sense of being an outsider, which needs to be nurtured rather than crushed. In business, that means never saying or implying “that’s not the way things are done around here.”

It also means giving people opportunities in areas they have interest, but no track record. Elon Musk, for example, had no experience or training as a rocket scientist when he came up with the idea of reusing rockets, and the innovative idea for SpaceX

2. Give people time to think beyond current job assignments.

When you are looking for breakthroughs, you need time to think outside the box without fear of consequences. Make it clear, as they do at Google, that you are expected to spend some “20 percent time” outside your current job assignment.

The payoff value of a person working alone on side projects, tapping into intrinsic motivation, has been the source of several of Google’s most famous products, including Gmail. 

3. Reinforce people’s belief in their ability to succeed.

One of the most powerful ways to increase creativity, at both the individual and organizational level, is to encourage people to take risks by lowering the price of failure, and even celebrating bold-but-intelligent failures.

Also, creating near-term project milestones, with plenty of opportunities to celebrate early progress, is extremely valuable to reinforce people’s belief in their ability.

4. Inspire ambitions by setting grand goals and purpose.

Driving business goals that have a social component that people can embrace as improving quality of life provides intrinsic motivation to increase creativity and effort in their activities. Steve Jobs was obsessed with revolutionizing personal expression, more than making a computer.

5. Tap into people’s natural interests and favorite activities.

In business, this is called finding the flow. It requires both self-awareness on what you like to do, and a willingness on the part of your manager to personalize work assignments. With most jobs, there are many ways to get to results, so let your employees tell you what steps and tools they prefer.

Thomas Edison loved to solve problems and he designed his own experiments. Thus he was happy to persevere, despite 10,000 of his light bulb filament material tests that didn’t work. 

6. Increase focus on technological and intellectual resources.

With today’s pervasive access to the Internet, with powerful search tools from Google, WolframAlpha, and many others, the Library of Congress is at everyone’s fingertips. They just need the inspiration, time, and training to capitalize on these tools, and the new devices that arrive every day.

Schilling and I do agree that you have to start with people who possess substantial intellect, so the conventional indicators of skill and accomplishments cannot be ignored.

In addition, it’s important to find partners and team members with a high need for achievement, a passionate idealism, and faith in their ability to overcome obstacles, often seen as a level of quirkiness.

We are talking here about finding and nurturing people who can literally help you change the world, because that’s what breakthrough innovation is all about. If your business and personal goals don’t measure up to that standard today, maybe your first focus should be on rethinking your own objectives.

The bar for staying competitive in business keeps going up.

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Top Cybersecurity Firm Carbon Black Names Chief Cybersecurity Officer

Carbon Black, a private cybersecurity firm headquartered in Waltham, Mass. that is rumored to be seeking an IPO this year, has appointed a chief cybersecurity officer.

The company has hired Tom Kellermann, a former executive at Trend Micro, a rival Japanese firm, where he held the same title. Kellermann most recently served as CEO and co-founder of Strategic Cyber Ventures, a cybersecurity-focused venture capital firm based in Washington, D.C., which is backed by Hudson Bay Capital, a New York-based hedge fund.

“I decided I needed to stop armchair quarterbacking and get back into the fight,” Kellermann tells Fortune. He says he had an epiphany while hiking in Boulder, Colo. last summer.

Kellermann, who started in the new role on January 22, says he will remain on at Strategic Cyber Ventures as vice chair of the board. The company has invested millions of dollars in a number of startups, including TrapX, E8 Security, ID DataWeb, and Polarity.

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Patrick Morley, Carbon Black’s CEO, said in a statement that Kellermann’s “experience perfectly matches the balance between innovative technology, security, and evangelism that we’re looking for at Carbon Black.”

Carbon Black, which sells subscriptions to software designed to detect and defend against digital threats, filed confidential paperwork in the fall for an initial public offering, the Wall Street Journal reported last year. The company has also been in talks with possible acquirers, such as IBM, VMware, and Microsoft, The Information reported at the beginning of the year.

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