Iomart Web Hosting Boosted Growth in Revenue by Adoption of Cloud Computing

Iomart Web Hosting, announced a positive set of consolidated half yearly results for the period ended 30 September 2012 boosted by adoption of cloud computing. Operational highlights for the previous six months included the purchase of three web hosting companies, including Melbourne Server Hosting in Manchester, and the investment in a high-speed, resilient UK fibre network connecting its seven data center locations.

Iomart Web Hosting Boosted Growth in Revenue by Adoption of Cloud Computing
Iomart Web Hosting Boosted Growth in Revenue by Adoption of Cloud Computing

Greatresponder.com on Nov 28, 2012: Iomart Web Hosting, announced a positive set of consolidated half yearly results for the period ended 30 September 2012 boosted by adoption of cloud computing. Operational highlights for the previous six months included the purchase of three web hosting companies, including Melbourne Server Hosting in Manchester, and the investment in a high-speed, resilient UK fibre network connecting its seven data center locations.

The Group also announced plans to add another 1486 m² (16,000 ft²) of capacity to its data center in Maidenhead to ensure the continued supply of high quality data center space. This will be fitted out to a high specification over the next 12 months.

Angus MacSween, CEO of iomart Group plc, said: “This has been another excellent trading period for iomart, delivering substantial growth both organically and through successful acquisitions. Trading in the second half of the year has begun well as the trend to outsource more and more services and infrastructure into the cloud accelerates. We continue to invest in our skills, product sets and infrastructure to deliver an increasing range and depth of cloud services and expect to continue the growth we have recently enjoyed. We therefore look forward with confidence.”

The financial highlights are: 29% growth in revenue to £19.9m (H1 2012: £15.4m); 66% rise in pre-tax profits to £4.9m (H1 2012: £3m); adjusted EBITDA growth of 51% to £7.6m (H1 2012: £5.0m); and cashflow from operations increased by 54% to £6.4m (H1 2012: £4.1m).

 

Frost & Sullivan: Firms in New Zealand Adopting Cloud Computing to Improve Their Business

The usage of cloud computing has grown over the past couple of years in New Zealand, as companies adopting cloud computing to improve business agility, increase standardization of IT infrastructure and lower cost of delivering IT services.

Frost & Sullivan: Firms in New Zealand Adopting Cloud Computing to Improve Their Business
Frost & Sullivan: Firms in New Zealand Adopting Cloud Computing to Improve Their Business

Greatresponder.com on Nov 26, 2012: The usage of cloud computing has grown over the past couple of years in New Zealand, as companies  adopting cloud computing to improve business agility, increase standardization of IT infrastructure and lower cost of delivering IT services.

Phil Harpur, Senior Research Manager, Australia & New Zealand ICT Practice, Frost & Sullivan says that 57% of organisations in New Zealand that are currently using cloud solutions plan to increase their cloud-based solutions budget significantly over the next 12 months, reflecting a market very much in a growth phase.

Compared to Australia, where 70% of organisations plan to increase their spending on cloud services, New Zealand’s tempered growth is largely due to data sovereignty and latency issues. “Local providers guarantee data remains in New Zealand but are more expensive than multinationals hosting data offshore, thus the value proposition is not as strong” Harpur explained.

Potential for share of pie in the cloud

Software as a Service (SaaS) is the most commonly used delivery model in the cloud offering several benefits over on-premise software such as lower upfront costs, standardisation and ease of upgrade, ubiquitous access and seamless integration with in-house infrastructure.  Adoption rates of SaaS applications are positively correlated with the size of the organisation. Larger organisations are more likely to be using software applications accessed via the cloud, especially for office productivity applications, CRM, HRM and ERP.

Benefits of moving to the cloud

The ability to lower overall IT costs is the leading driver for the adoption of cloud computing. Andre Clarke, Country Manager, New Zealand, Frost & Sullivan says “Moving to the cloud enables organsiations to reduce CAPEX, and provides a great deal of flexibility and agility allowing organisations to add scalable computing resources very quickly and at relatively low cost.  This in turn greatly reduces some of the risk associated with developing new products which in the medium to long term will help stimulate market innovation.”

“Key challenges include integrating “shadow IT” cloud purchases into a corporate framework, ensuring effective SLAs and security measures are in place, and managing the increased level of complexity that comes with combining multiple clouds with on-premise resources” Clarke mentions.

 

Companies in Egypt Target ‘Cloud Computing” to Boost Revenues and Reduce Costs

Gartner and IDC the market analysts leading agencies; have estimated an exponential growth of the cloud computing with predictions estimating it to reach a value of $72.9bn by 2015.

Companies in Egypt Target ‘Cloud Computing” to Boost Revenues and Reduce Costs
Companies in Egypt Target ‘Cloud Computing” to Boost Revenues and Reduce Costs

Greatresponder.com on Nov 21, 2012: Gartner and IDC the market analysts leading agencies; have estimated an exponential growth of the cloud computing with predictions estimating it to reach a value of $72.9bn by 2015. George DeBono, General Manager of Red Hat, Middle East and Africa, makes some predictions on what Egyptian enterprises can expect in the cloud computing space in 2013:

OpenStack demonstrates the power of community innovation.

The OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) project is a great example of community-driven development. 2013 is going to see all that developer involvement lead to commercial product in the same way that the open source development model has led to innovative products in operating systems, middleware and countless other areas. Openness is one of the most important enablers of hybrid IT because it helps users avoid lock-in to vendors and specific ecosystems. And not just open source but openness across multiple dimensions including APIs, standards and the requirement that permission to use intellectual property, like copyrights and patents, must be granted in ways that make the technology open and accessible to the user. Openness is also about having vibrant, upstream communities that are at the heart of the innovation that the open source development model makes possible.

Security becomes more consumable.

If you pay any attention whatsoever to tech press coverage and IT industry analyst reports, you know that security concerns about “the cloud” (however that term is being used at the moment) consistently top the list of adoption concerns. Even if naïve cloud safe/unsafe arguments have mostly been retired in favor of more subtle discussions, there’s still a lot of complexity and uncertainty. Organizations like the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) are making concerted efforts to promote the use of best practices for providing security assurance within cloud computing, and to provide education on the uses of cloud computing to help secure additional forms of computing. While the CSA’s work benefits everyone, its most important role may be “democratizing” the process of securing and running clouds so that organizations operating and using clouds don’t need security rocket scientists on hand. Expect to see tools for more easily and systematically securing clouds gain more attention in 2013.

Bring-Your-Own-Device doubters reach the fifth step: Acceptance.

BYOD is one of the trends that some like to cite as a key cloud security issue given that it takes control away from IT and puts it in the hands of users. IT professionals often comment along the lines of “Just you wait. Enterprise IT departments are going to come to their senses and take the iPads out of those darned kids.” (Or something along those lines)

Private (and hybrid) Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) goes mainstream.

Like other aspects of cloud computing, PaaS has evolved in response to the market. The basic idea of PaaS—that many application developers don’t want to be exposed to and have to deal with the underlying operating system and associated plumbing—remains in place. However, PaaS platforms that limit developers to a specific language on a specific hosting platform have only seen lukewarm acceptance.