Netflix crosses $100 billion market cap as subscribers surge

(Reuters) – Netflix Inc (NFLX.O) snagged 2 million more subscribers than Wall Street expected in the final three months of last year, tripling profits at the online video service that is burning money on new programming to dominate internet television around the world.

The results drove Netflix to a market capitalization of more than $100 billion for the first time. Shares jumped 9 percent to a new high over $248 in after-hours trading on Monday after rallying throughout the month and rising 53 percent last year.

After signing up more than half of all U.S. broadband households, Netflix is building its customer base in 190 countries by spending billions on programming.

Netflix picked up 6.36 million subscribers in international markets from October through December, when it released new seasons of critically acclaimed shows “Stranger Things” and “The Crown” as well as Will Smith action movie “Bright.” That topped Wall Street expectations of 5.1 million, according to FactSet.

Along with 1.98 million customer additions in the United States, the company ended the year with 117.58 million streaming subscribers around the globe, a sharp uptick even after price increases in October.

“Netflix is pouring more and more money into making content, and it is directly translating into more subscribers,” BTIG analyst Richard Greenfield said. “They see a huge opportunity and they are moving as fast as they can to attack it.”

The company also said it took a $39 million non-cash charge for “unreleased content we’ve decided not to move forward with.” A source familiar with the matter said the charge was related to content starring Kevin Spacey, with whom Netflix cut ties after he was accused of sexual misconduct.

Netflix temporarily halted production of “House of Cards” to write out Spacey’s character and decided not to release the film “Gore,” which starred Spacey as Gore Vidal.

Spacey has apologized to one of his accusers, and according to his representatives is seeking unspecified treatment.

The charge is one of the first signs of costs faced by companies in the wake of a widespread campaign against sexual harassment.

FILE PHOTO: The Netflix logo is pictured on a television in this illustration photograph taken in Encinitas, California, U.S., on January 18, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo

Netflix turned a DVD-by-mail business into an online competitor of movie channel HBO. As it grew it began licensing its own original shows to ensure a stream of new offerings if studio suppliers ended deals.

In fact, Walt Disney Co (DIS.N) is making a major push into online streaming and will pull its first-run shows and movies from Netflix in 2019 as Hollywood fights for audiences.

Netflix plans to spend up to $8 billion this year on TV shows and movies to fend off Disney, Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O), studios-owned Hulu and local competitors that are jumping into online video.

In 2017, Netflix recorded its first full-year profit in international markets. The company has said it is aiming for steady improvements in profitability overseas this year.

“We believe our big investments in content are paying off,” Netflix said in a quarterly letter to shareholders.

Netflix is raising its marketing budget faster than revenue is growing and expects negative cash flow in 2018 of $3 billion to $4 billion, up from $2 billion in 2017.

Last October, Netflix raised prices for two of its three main subscription plans to help fund the substantial content investment, helping to drive revenue higher.

For the December quarter, Netflix reported diluted earnings-per-share of 41 cents, even with the expectations of analysts polled by Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.

Revenue for the three months totaled $3.286 billion, in line with forecasts.

Looking ahead, Netflix forecast streaming customer additions of 6.35 million for the first quarter, above analysts’ expectation of 5.01 million, according to FactSet.

Investors appear confident in Netflix’s ability to grow. Netflix recently traded at 91 times expected earnings for the next 12 months, versus Amazon at 152 times earnings and Disney at 17 times earnings, according to Thomson Reuters data.

Reporting by Lisa Richwine in Los Angeles and Aishwarya Venugopal in Bengaluru; Editing by Peter Henderson and Lisa Shumaker

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Space Startup Rocket Lab Has Reached Orbit For the First Time

The six-year-old startup Rocket Lab has successfully put a rocket into orbit, and deployed a payload of three satellites. The launch started from New Zealand at 2:43 Sunday afternoon, or 8:43 p.m. Saturday U.S. Eastern Time. The mission, dubbed “Still Testing,” was the second using the company’s lightweight Electron rocket.

Rocket Lab streamed its launch live, and it can still be viewed on YouTube, complete with informative commentary.

Rocket Lab aims to lower the cost of access to space, in a way parallel to, but distinct from, the mission of Elon Musk’s SpaceX. Where SpaceX seems near mastering the art of landing and reusing large rockets, Rocket Lab wants to produce smaller ones, using lower-cost methods like 3-D printing.

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Those smaller rockets — including the current Electron model — are meant to serve the growing demand for deployment of small satellites known as microsats or cubesats. According to the Wall Street Journal, Rocket Lab is aiming to double its rocket production by this summer to meet that demand.

The payload for the launch, according to SpaceNews, included two cubesats for the data company Spire and one for Planet Labs. Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck told SpaceNews that the succesful launch meant the company would move forward with commercial missions.

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Google CEO Has No Regrets About Firing Author of Anti-Diversity Memo

Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Friday expressed no regret over the firing of James Damore, author of an infamous memo criticizing Google’s pro-diversity policies and culture.

During an appearance with YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, Pichai said, “I don’t regret it,” when asked about Damore’s firing by Recode head Kara Swisher. He insisted that the firing was primarily a strategic decision for Google. “The last thing we do when we make decisions like this is look at it with a political lens,” Pichai said, according to TechCrunch.

Google has been working to increase its hiring of women. Damore’s memo, which became public in August, argued in part that women might not be biologically suited for careers in engineering or technology. Many commentators felt that retaining Damore after the memo’s distribution would make Google a hostile work environment for women.

Wojcicki also described the firing as “the right decision.”

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Though Google’s priority was internal cohesion, Damore’s memo was broadly criticized by many in the tech sector and beyond, including for faulty interpretations of biological science. Damore quickly revised inaccurate representations that he had completed a Harvard PhD in biology.

At the same time, reports did indicate that Damore’s views were quietly widespread in the lower ranks of Google.

Damore earlier this month initiated a lawsuit against Google, alleging that the company discriminates against white men. That case seems difficult to make on its face, since its most recent diversity report found that the company is 69% male and 91% white or Asian, with black or Hispanic people making up only 3% and 4% of new hires, respectively.

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